World's first 7nm chip process for automotive

May 29, 2020 //By Nick Flaherty
TSMC's 7nm process technology is the first for automotive and includes tool support from Ansys for developing AI, advanced driver assistance and autonomous driving chips.
TSMC's 7nm process technology is the first for automotive and includes tool support from Ansys for developing AI, advanced driver assistance and autonomous driving chips.

Taiwanese foundry TSMC has launched the world's first automotive-qualified 7nm process technology.

The 7nm Automotive Design Enablement Platform (ADEP) is aimed at the development of AI Inferencing Engines, Advanced Driver-assistance Systems (ADAS) and Autonomous Driving applications, and has automotive ISO26262 and AECQ-100 qualification. The process technology will also be available for automotive product lifetimes, which are typically over 10 years.

The 7nm family of technologies has been in volume production at TMSC since 2018, which allows the company to improve the quality and yield as well as meet the rigorous durability and reliability requirements of the automotive industry.

TSMC’s ADEP is certified with the ISO 26262 standard for functional safety, and consists of Standard Cell, GPIO, and SRAM foundation IP.

This foundation IP has passed rigorous qualification according to AEC-Q100 Grade-1. Process design kits and support from third party vendor IPs are also available. Synopsys for example has LPDDR4x, MIPI CSI-2 and D-PHY, PCI Express 4.0 and security IP qualified to ISO26262 and AECQ-100 for the 7nm process.

The ADEP is based around a collaboration with EDA tool maker Ansys to boost the reliability of the 7nm process to make it suitable for automotive design. The workflows support electromigration (EM), thermal reliability including self-heat and chip package thermal co-analysis and electrostatic discharge. It also includes a new workflow for statistical electromigration budgeting (SEB).

SEB enables chip designers to meet stringent safety and reliability requirements by prioritizing the most important EM fixes for signoff while avoiding over design.

"The IPs and Systems-on-Chips (SoCs) designed for automotive applications using TSMC's N7 (7nm) process technology offer increased integration, functionality and operating speeds but must meet rigorous requirements for functional safety and reliability," said Suk Lee, Senior Director, Design Infrastructure Marketing Division at TSMC.

"Safety and reliability standards are increasingly stringent in next-generation automotive systems, mandating the need for a comprehensive multi-physics simulation platform that simultaneously solves for thermal effects, reliability, power-timing and performance across the


Vous êtes certain ?

Si vous désactivez les cookies, vous ne pouvez plus naviguer sur le site.

Vous allez être rediriger vers Google.